Dec 14, 2018  
2012-2013 Catalog 
    
2012-2013 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Accounting

  
  •  

    ACCT 201 - Principles of Accounting (3)


    A study of the fundamental theory and principles of accounting concepts for reporting financial information to business users. The course stresses the relationship between the rules by which financial statements are prepared and the use of financial statement information for decision making. This course covers accounting terms, organization of accounts, the accounting cycle, working papers, and financial statements.   This study continues in ACCT 202.

  
  •  

    ACCT 202 - Principles of Accounting II (3)


    A continuation of ACCT 201. This course concludes the fundamental study of financial accounting and then introduces the study of theory and principles of managerial and cost accounting concepts. The course stresses the use of accounting information for decision making and role of managerial accounting in a business environment. This course covers budgeting, costs systems, accounting for corporations, and financial statement analysis.

    Prerequisite(s):  
  
  •  

    ACCT 230 - Intermediate Accounting I (3)


    An in-depth study of the theory and principles, along with the application of accounting concepts for reporting financial information.    The accounting conceptual framework, information systems and components of the financial statements will be emphasized.     This study continues in ACCT 231.

    Prerequisite(s):  
  
  •  

    ACCT 231 - Intermediate Accounting II (3)


    A continuation of ACCT 230. An in-depth study of the theory and principles, along with the application of accounting concepts for reporting financial information.    The accounting conceptual framework, information systems and components of the financial statements will be emphasized.     Specifically, this course will cover accounting theory and practice for assets, liabilities and equity.

    Prerequisite(s):  
  
  •  

    ACCT 250 - Managerial Accounting (3)


    A focus on the fundamental concepts of managerial accounting.   Includes the analysis of internal accounting information with emphasis on use of such data for performance evaluation, control, cost analysis, capital budgeting, cash flows, and cost information.

  
  •  

    ACCT 260 - Income Tax (3)


    A study of the Internal Revenue Code and regulations for individuals, partnerships and corporations. An in depth study and application of the IRC for income, deductions, expenses and tax credits for individual and small business.

  
  •  

    ACCT 280 - Computer Based Accounting (3)


    Application of general purpose accounting software.  This course allows the student to enter, process, generate reports and complete the accounting cycle for small business. 

  
  •  

    ACCT 292 - Accounting Internship (3)


    Application of classroom study with supervised work experience. Emphasis is practical application of accounting theory and skills learned in an actual business environment. Internships last no longer than a semester. Interns are not employees of the sponsoring company.


Academic Foundations

  
  •  

    ACFN 010 - Introduction to Critical Composition (3)


    Students will be introduced to composition, which involves critical analysis of reading material, forming of hypothesis, and construction of intelligent, coherent, full-length essays. Mechanical issues such as grammar, punctuation, and spelling will be addressed primarily on an individual basis, as students are encouraged, with assistance, to recognize their own strengths and weaknesses. Several workshop sessions will be held.

    Grading is pass/fail only.
  
  •  

    ACFN 019 - Special Topics (1-4)


    This course will serve as a “funnel” for students to transition into developmental studies. The following assessment will be used as a guideline for placement: ACT 14 or below. This special topics course will be used for Reading, Writing, and Math Transition and will institute a collaboration between Adult Based Education (ABE) and Blue Ridge Community and Technical College with instruction in the fundamental principles of reading, writing, and math and will prepare the student for ACFN developmental courses.

  
  •  

    ACFN 020 - Basic Drug Calculations (3)


    This course develops skills to solve typical computational problems encountering in nursing practice. Operations of arithmetic (addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division) including fractions and decimals, ratio, proportion, introduction to algebraic notation, and the metric system. Examines units in the household and apothecary systems; dosage conversion among these systems; intravenous calculations. Optional units include powders and crystals, solutions, and children’s dosages. Enrollment as audit is not permitted unless recommended by the appropriate Student Academic Support Services or nursing personnel.

  
  •  

    ACFN 050 - Consumer Mathematics (1)


    This course develops problem-solving skills to deal with consumer topics. Topics include interests and saving account computations, maturity values, commissions, markups, discounts, payroll deductions, tax forms, comparison-shopping, credit costs, income, and expenditures to budgets, and interpretations of tables and charts. Enrollment other than audit permitted only if advised by the appropriate Student Academic Support Services personnel.

    Pre-requisite/Co-requisite(s): ACFN 060 or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    ACFN 065 - Pre-Algebra (3)


    This is the first in a two-semester series in developmental mathematics. In addition to traditional classroom lectures and question/answer sessions, students are required to attend a weekly laboratory session. The laboratory session is the mechanism by which the students assess and address their course progress. This course requires approximately 3-4 additional hours per week using an online mathematics computer program to complete homework and tutorial programs. Students will learn how to perform operations on real numbers, the implications of exponents and the order of operations, and how to evaluate algebraic expressions. The concepts of percents and their applications, introductory geometry, statistics, and problem solving skills will all be incorporated. Students will solve equations in one variable, solve literal equations for a variable, and evaluate/graph inequalities. Students will translate and solve algebraic equations, and learn the skills required to solve application problems in one and two variables. Students will interpret and graph linear equations as well as solving and analyzing systems of equations. Students will also be introduced to operations on polynomials.

    Prerequisite(s): Placement
  
  •  

    ACFN 085 - Basic Algebra (3)


    This is the second in a two-semester series in developmental mathematics. In addition to traditional classroom lectures and question/answer sessions, students are required to attend a weekly laboratory session. The laboratory session is the mechanism by which the students assess and address their course progress. This course requires approximately 3-4 additional hours per week using an online mathematics computer program to complete homework and tutorial programs. Students will perform operations on polynomials, rational and radical expressions. Students will use various methods to factor polynomials. Students will solve rational and radical expressions, and apply these skills to solving application problems. The concept of functions will be introduced as well as their operations. Linear inequalities will be revisited with interval notation and applications.

    Prerequisite(s): ACFN 065  or placement.
  
  •  

    ACFN 095 - Developing College Reading Skills (3)


    College courses require that students are able to read and comprehend college-level textbooks and other types of college reading material. This reading course provides the opportunity to learn and adopt reading skills that will promote success in college. It emphasizes reading rate, vocabulary development, effective comprehension of main ideas and supporting details, paragraph organization, and textbook reading. It also covers effective reading habits and application of skills in content area reading material. The goal of this course is the development of effective college-level reading skills which will enable the student to be successful in reading academic and career goals.


Apprenticeship

  
  •  

    APTR 101 - ACDS: Introductory Child Development (5)


    This basic course is an overview of the “pieces” of development in young children, including emotional, social, mental, and physical development. The focus is on the relationship between stages of growth in separate areas of development and the activities, which promote development.

  
  •  

    APTR 102 - ACDS: Planning for the Whole Child (5)


    This course is a continuation of the study of child development, but in contrast to the first semester, will look at the child as a whole. The focus will be on the integration within the child of the different areas of development. Typical behavior exhibited as a child progresses through stages and the unique characteristics of individual children will be analyzed. Planning appropriate curriculum according to developmental levels will be emphasized. Health and safety issues that arise when children reach new levels of ability will be explored.

  
  •  

    APTR 103 - ACDS: Facilitation of Learning (5)


    This course emphasizes the role of the teacher in fostering optimum development through a.) positive interactions with children, b.) effective individual and group management techniques, c.) appropriate classroom design, and d.) curriculum planning. An understanding of discipline as the development of self-control will be emphasized.

  
  •  

    APTR 104 - ACDS: Becoming Independent (5)


    This course will assist the apprentice in managing and administering a quality environment for young children. Problem solving about concerns that arise in daily operation will be practiced.

  
  •  

    APTR 105 - Apprenticeship in Child Development (12)


    This course provides the apprentice with 4,000 hours of supervised on-the-job training in participating childcare programs. Formal instruction is integrated with direct experience in early education settings where apprentices reflect and critically analyze their experiences. A portfolio is used to document the apprentice’s learning/work throughout the apprenticeship program.

  
  •  

    APTR 106 - Introduction, Best Practices for Direct Support Specialists (5)


    The student will have orientation to the role of the Direct Support Professional: Co-worker, mentor, and supervisory relationships. The course includes an overview of specialized and technical knowledge unique to the work environment, developmental disabilities, behavioral health, child development/welfare, fragile elders, substance abuse, traumatic brain injury, and at-risk youth. Health and medical concerns unique to the work environment will be addressed. An introduction to roles of specialists/ consultants supporting service participants is included as are recognition and correction of hazards in the workplace. Eliciting, respecting, and actively supporting participant choices and preferences is emphasized.

  
  •  

    APTR 107 - Client Advocacy and Wellness (5)


    This course promotes empowerment and self-confidence of service participants and defines common forms of abuse, neglect, and exploitation. A mastery of abuse prevention strategies is emphasized. Students are taught to recognize sign of abuse, neglect and exploitation. Medication Administration and supporting self-administration are included where appropriate. The course covers characteristics of a healthy life style and responses to individual health needs.

  
  •  

    APTR 108 - Communications and Teaching/Supporting Others (5)


    This course includes the following content: Basic team communication skills and facilitation structures; effective, efficient, and timely documentation; use of alternative communication devices; teaching strategies, principles of reinforcement, relationships, task analysis and prompting, positive feedback, and natural teaching times. The teaching skills are customized to the individuals in the support environment.

  
  •  

    APTR 109 - Crisis Management (5)


    Develop awareness of the individual needs of service participants. Familiarity with crises typical or common to the support environment. Familiarity with procedures for prevention and intervention in a typical crises. Standard operating procedures following a crises. Familiarity with statutes and regulations. Conflict resolution.

  
  •  

    APTR 110 - Supervised Work Experience (12)


    This course provides the apprentice with 4000 hours of supervised on-the-job training in participating direct care facilities. Formal instruction is integrated with direct experience in elder care or social work settings where apprentices reflect and critically analyze their experiences.


Art

  
  •  

    ART 103 - Introduction to Visual Arts (3)


    This is an introductory course designed to give insight into the nature of the visual arts and the relationship to the human condition. The course includes a study of the functions of various forms of art in which students are exposed to a variety of visual arts experiences to promote a deeper understanding of and appreciation for the role of the visual arts in contemporary society.

  
  •  

    ART 199 - Special Topics (1-4)


    A special topic (ST) has a different course description for each course offered under the ST code. The division will keep a record of every special topics course offered with this subject code, including the course description.

  
  •  

    ART 299 - Special Topics (1-4)


    A special topic (ST) has a different course description for each course offered under the ST code. The division will keep a record of every special topics course offered with this subject code, including the course description.


Allied Health Science

  
  •  

    CAHS 100 - The Human Body (3)


    This will be a survey course of basic Human Anatomy. It is designed for students who need a rudimentary understanding of the human body and its organ systems but not in the detail that would be expected of a Health Care Professional. This course will not substitute for CAHS 120 , CAHS 121 , CAHS 122  or CAHS 123 .

  
  •  

    CAHS 101 - General Biological Science I (4)


    This is semester one of a two-semester general biology course which, with CAHS 102 , satisfies the Liberal Arts requirement. This is an integrated lecture and laboratory course dealing with both plants and animals, related to our environment from molecule to biosphere. This course focuses on molecular and cellular biology, patterns of inheritance and genetics, biotechnology, and mechanisms of evolution.

  
  •  

    CAHS 102 - General Biological Science II (4)


    This is semester two of a two-semester general biology course which, with CAHS 101 , satisfies the Liberal Arts science requirement. This is an integrated lecture and laboratory course dealing with both plants and animals, related to our environment from molecule to biosphere. This course focuses on plant and animal structure and function, the dynamics of populations, communities and ecosystems, and human impact on the biosphere.

  
  •  

    CAHS 103 - General Physical Science (4)


    This is an introductory survey course which explores the major concepts in physics and chemistry. Topics covered will include motion, matter and energy, atomic models, nuclear structure, waves, and electricity. A combination of conceptual framework, practical applications, and problem solving will be utilized in the integrated laboratory and lecture course.

  
  •  

    CAHS 104 - General Physical Science (4)


    An introductory survey course which explores the major concepts in geology, astronomy, and meteorology. Topics covered will include rocks and minerals, weathering and erosion, surface and groundwater, geologic time, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, and mountains; light and telescopes, the solar system, stars, nebulae, and galaxies; the origin of the universe; the basics of meteorology, and the effects of weather and climate. A combination of conceptual framework, practical applications, and problem solving will be utilized in the integrated laboratory and lecture course.

  
  •  

    CAHS 120 - Anatomy and Physiology for Health Care Professionals I (3)


    One course in a two-course sequence that provides a detailed review of the human organism, this course will provide a brief overview of the human body and the chemical basis for activities occurring within the body, a detailed review of the cell, tissues, the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems as well as an overview of the human senses.

    Corerequisite(s): CAHS 121 .
  
  •  

    CAHS 121 - Anatomy and Physiology for Health Care Professionals Lab I (1)


    A laboratory course in human anatomy and physiology to be taken concurrently with CAHS 120 .

  
  •  

    CAHS 122 - Anatomy and Physiology for Health Care Professionals II (3)


    The second course in a two-course sequence that provides a detailed review of the human organism, this course provides a detailed review of cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems.

    Prerequisite(s): CAHS 120  & CAHS 121 .
    Corerequisite(s): CAHS 123 .
  
  •  

    CAHS 123 - Anatomy and Physiology for Health Care Professionals Lab II (1)


    A laboratory course in human anatomy and physiology to be taken concurrently with CAHS 122 .

  
  •  

    CAHS 125 - Introduction to College Chemistry (4)


    This course is for students with little or no prior background in chemistry, whose program (AS Nursing, for example) requires one semester of chemistry, or who require preparation for additional coursework in chemistry. Emphasis is on calculations and measurement, dimensional analysis, formulas, and equations, stoichiometry, atomic structure and molecular geometry, gas laws and solutions.

    Prerequisite(s): Math placement or ACFN 065 /ACFN 085  is a pre-requisite.
  
  •  

    CAHS 127 - General, Organic & Biochemistry I (4)


    This course will include an overview of the Metric System, Scientific Notation, Temperature Scales, Density, Atoms, Structure, Isotopes, Electrons, Periodic Table, Chemical Formulae, Types of Chemical Reactions, Quantification of Chemical Reactions, Mass, Moles, Energy, Kinetic, Potential, Law of Conservation of Energy, Thermochemistry, Matter, pH, Fission, Fusion, Functional Groups and Names, and General Organic Reactions to Form Functional Groups. This course is designed as the first in a one year sequence of courses intended for nursing or other allied health students who intend to transfer to a four year academic institution which requires a two semester sequence course in General, Organic and Biochemistry (GOB). This course sequence could also provide a 8 credit General Education Science sequence. The course consists of a lecture portion and a laboratory portion.

    Prerequisite(s): The ability to take a 100 level math course is a required pre-requisite.
  
  •  

    CAHS 128 - General, Organic & Biochemistry II (4)


    This course will include an overview of Alcohols, Reactions, Aldehydes and Ketones, Organic Acids, Amines, Aromatic Compounds, Heterocyclic Compounds, DNA, Hyper-, Iso-, Hypotonic Solutions, Metabolic Disorders, Complex Carbohydrates, Proteins, Lipids, Nucleic Acids, Body Fluids, Blood, Clotting Chemistry, Respiratory Exchange, Metabolic and Respiratory Acidosis and Ketosis. This course is designed as the first in a one year sequence of courses intended for nursing or other allied health students who intend to transfer to a four year academic institution which requires a two semester sequence course in General, Organic and Biochemistry (GOB). This course sequence could also provide a 8 credit General Education Science sequence. The course consists of a lecture portion and a laboratory portion.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion is CAHS 127  is a prerequisite.
  
  •  

    CAHS 130 - Chemistry for Fire and Safety (4)


    This course is designed for students majoring in Fire Science or Safety Technology. It introduces students to the basic concepts of chemistry in a one-semester format where laboratory topics are integrated with the lecture. This course covers the fundamental principles of chemistry with a particular emphasis on the chemistry of hazardous materials and fire chemistry.

  
  •  

    CAHS 140 - Intro to Healthcare (3)


    This course is a foundation course for selected allied health programs. The course introduces students to a variety of health occupations and assists students in acquiring the basic knowledge skills, and professional behaviors needed to work and interact with clients in a healthcare setting.

  
  •  

    CAHS 141 - Intro to Pharmacology (3)


    This course provides information on a variety of medications that are commonly administer in the healthcare setting. Major drug categories associated with body systems will be reviewed. Students will learn about drug pharmacokinetics, dosage, preparation, administration and interactions.

  
  •  

    CAHS 142 - Pathophysiology of Disease (3)


    Pathophysiology of diseases will build upon previously learned knowledge of normal anatomy and normal physiology. This course will discuss pathologies and abnormalities that are deviations from the norm. For all pathologies, we will discuss: causes, signs and symptoms, diagnosis, diagnostic tests, treatments, and prognosis. The pathologies will be organized according to body system, including: cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, gastrointestinal, urinary, reproductive, endocrine, nervous, musculoskeletal, and integumentary. Other topics will include infectious diseases, neoplasms, hereditary diseases, diseases of the blood, and mental/cognitive disorders.

  
  •  

    CAHS 143 - Spanish for Healthcare (3)


    Medical Spanish for HealthCare Providers has been designed for healthcare practitioners and all individuals who interact with Hispanic patients who have limited English communication skills. Emphasis will be placed on communication and phrases needed to complete a patient assessment, and explain medical procedures.

  
  •  

    CAHS 150 - EKG Technician (1–12)


    This comprehensive Certified EKG Technician Program prepares students to function as EKG/Cardiovascular Technicians and to take the American Society of Phlebotomy Technician (ASPT) - Electrocardiograph (EKG) Technician exam in addition to other National Certification Exams. This course will include important practice and background information on anatomy of the heart and physiology, medical disease processes, medical terminology, medical ethics, legal aspects of patient contact, laboratory assisting, respiratory therapy assisting, electro cardiology and echo cardiology. Additionally, students will practice with equipment and perform hands-on labs including introduction to the function and proper use of the EKG machine, the Holter monitor, the normal anatomy of the chest wall for proper lead placement, echo cardiology, 12-lead placement and other clinical practices. EKG Technicians also analyze printed readings of EKG test, measuring various “peaks and troughs” and determining normal vs. abnormal EKG. The EKG/Cardiovascular Technician Certification Program includes a graded final exam to help prepare students for the ASPT-EKG Technician Exam. This course is eligible for college credit after successful completion of the program.

  
  •  

    CAHS 151 - Medical Coding/Billing (1–12)


    This billing and coding course offers the skills needed to solve insurance billing problems, how to manually file claims (using the CPT and ICD-9 manual), complete common insurance forms, trace delinquent claims, appeal denied claims and use generic forms to streamline billing procedures. The course covers the following areas: CPT (introduction, guidelines, evaluation and management), specialty fields (surgery, radiology, and laboratory), ICD-9 (introduction and guidelines) and basic claims processes for medical insurance and third party reimbursement. Students will learn how to find the service and codes using coding manuals (CPT, ICD-9, and HCPCS). Students who complete this course could be qualified to sit for the American Academy of Professional Coders (AAPC) - Certifies Professional Coder Exam (CPC or CPC-H - Apprentice); the American Health Information Association (AHIMA) Certified Coding Associate (CCA) exam; and/or other National Certification Exams. This course is eligible for college credit after successful completion of the program.

  
  •  

    CAHS 152 - Pharmacy Technician (1–12)


    This comprehensive course will prepare students to enter the pharmacy field and to take the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board’s PTCB exam. Technicians work in hospitals, home infusion pharmacies, community pharmacies and other health care settings - working under the supervision of a registered pharmacist. Course content includes medical terminology specific to the pharmacy, reading and interpreting prescriptions and defining drugs by generic and brand names. Students will learn dosage calculations, I.V. flow rates, drug compounding, dose conversions, dispensing of prescriptions, inventory control billing and reimbursement. The pharmacy Technician Certification Program includes a graded final exam to help prepare students for the PTCB exam. This course is eligible for college credit after successful completion of the program.

  
  •  

    CAHS 153 - Phlebotomy Technician (1–12)


    The Phlebotomy Technician Certification Program prepares professionals to collect blood specimens from clients for the purpose of laboratory analysis. Students will become familiar with all aspects related to blood collection and develop comprehensive skills to perform venipunctures completely and safely. Classroom work includes terminology, anatomy and physiology; blood collection procedures; specimen hands-on practice; and training in skills and techniques to perform puncture methods. The program also includes lab exercises, live blood draws, work with a training arm and other exercises intended to prepare students to function as an entry level Phlebotomy Technician. This course is eligible for college credit after successful completion of the program.

  
  •  

    CAHS 154 - Dental Assisting (1–12)


    The Dental Assisting program prepares students for entry level positions in a variety of health care settings including dentist offices, hospitals and other similar facilities, familiarizing the student with all areas of pre-clinical dental assisting and training in the professional skills required to function as an assistant in the dental practice. It covers the following key areas and topics - Administrative aspects: the history of dentistry and dental assisting; introduction to the dental office; the legal aspects of dentistry and dental assisting; policies and guidelines. Clinical aspects: introduction to oral anatomy; dental equipment, operation, and maintenance; introduction to tooth structure; primary and permanent teeth; the oral cavity and related structures; proper patient positioning; dental hand pieces; dental anesthesia; sterilization; maintaining sterility and asepsis. This program does not include a national or state certification objective which in most states require 1 to 2 years of training or education. This course is eligible for college credit after successful completion of the program.

  
  •  

    CAHS 155 - ICD-10 Medical Coding Course (1-12)


    This course is part of our CCI Fast- Track Allied Health coursework. This program will include a detailed review of both ICD-10 (diagnostic coding) and ICD-10-PCS (inpatient procedural coding system). Additional program elements include differences between ICD-9 and ICD-10; federal regulation / compliance; using the ICD-10 Manual; how and when to use the ICD-10-PCS; issues surrounding the implementation of ICD-10. Documentation challenges; analyzing electronic coding tools; coding from chart notes; coding from operative reports; and detailed hands on coding exercises and case studies using ICD-10. This course is ideal for experienced students interested in a career in medical coding and for current coding professionals looking for an update and review of the issues and challenges they will face with the upcoming ICD-10 adoption.

  
  •  

    CAHS 170 - Allied Health Pharmacology (3)


    This course focuses on the specific information required for nursing and other allied health professionals to safely administer medications in today’s complex health care environment. Specific medication information according to affected body systems will be presented. Additional information about legal requirements, clinical research trials, herbal and nutritional supplements and substance abuse will also be covered.

  
  •  

    CAHS 199 - Special Topics (1-4)


    A special topic (ST) has a different course description for each course offered under the ST code. The division will keep a record of every special topics course offered with this subject code, including the course description.

  
  •  

    CAHS 200 - Nutrition (3)


    A study of the functions, sources, and requirements of nutrients. Emphasis is placed on meeting the nutritional needs of individuals of all ages in a variety of situations.

  
  •  

    CAHS 210 - Human Growth & Development (3)


    A course for students in the health sciences that explores the basic principles of human growth & development throughout the life span. Prenatal development, as well as physical, emotional, mental, and social changes in children, adolescents, and adults will be reviewed. The multiple factors that influence development & shape personality will be considered.

  
  •  

    CAHS 220 - Microbiology (3)


    A course for students in the health and life sciences, to be taken concurrently with the 1-credit laboratory. The course will emphasize the impact of microorganisms on human health and disease, including identification and control pathogens, the mechanisms of pathogenicity and disease transmission, host resistance, and immunity. Other aspects of microbiology will also be considered, including basic microbial metabolic activities and their role in nutrient cycling and as experimental subjects; biotechnology and recombinant DNA will be introduced.

    Prerequisite(s): one semester of a college-level biology or allied health science course, and one semester of a college-level chemistry course.
  
  •  

    CAHS 221 - Microbiology Lab (1)


    A laboratory course in microbiological identification and experimentation techniques, to be taken concurrently with CAHS 220 .

  
  •  

    CAHS 299 - Special Topics (1-4)


    A special topic (ST) has a different course description for each course offered under the ST code. The division will keep a record of every special topics course offered with this subject code, including the course description.


Banking

  
  •  

    CAIB 199 - Special Topics (1-4)


    A special topic (ST) has a different course description for each course offered under the ST code. The division will keep a record of every special topics course offered with this subject code, including the course description.

  
  •  

    CAIB 201 - Analysis Financial Statements (3)


    A practical introduction to financial analysis from the viewpoint of the commercial loan officer, this course provides the skills needed to effectively assess a borrower’s ability to repay loans.

  
  •  

    CAIB 202 - Customer Service in Banking (1)


    Participants in this course use a variety of exercises and group activities to define basic customer service skills and examine how the use of those skills adds to the personal and professional productivity levels of the participants. Participants can use a worksheet to chart their own customer service skills.

  
  •  

    CAIB 203 - Principles of Banking (3)


    Long recognized as the standard introduction to the banking profession, this course touches on nearly every aspect of banking, from the fundamentals of negotiable instruments to contemporary issues and developments within the industry. It is the foundation for all AIB training.

  
  •  

    CAIB 205 - Consumer Lending (3)


    In this comprehensive overview of the consumer lending business, participants learn the essentials about closed-end loans, indirect loans and related credit products, and open-end credit procedures. They also trace the consumer lending process from developing and taking loan applications to collection and recovery. The course explores what is involved in a credit investigation, decision-making, loan pricing, and loan policy. Participants develop a greater understanding for relationship building, new lending technologies, and the importance of consumer regulations.

  
  •  

    CAIB 206 - Supervision: Concepts and Skill Building (3)


    This program helps new and potential supervisors to become better managers by emphasizing broad prospective and by combining fresh insights with the interpersonal relations required of today’s successful mangers.

  
  •  

    CAIB 207 - Banking Today and Cross Selling (1)


    This course gives you an orientation to the essential principles, concepts, and operations of banking.

  
  •  

    CAIB 208 - Consumer & Mortgage Lending (1)


    This course provides participants with the basic knowledge about consumer credit. It covers terminology, basic categories of consumer credit, determining credit worthiness, the application process, and bank regulations.

  
  •  

    CAIB 209 - Law and Banking Principles (3)


    Every part of the banking process, from taking deposits and making loans to operating safe deposit boxes and offering trust services, is governed by laws for the purpose of protecting consumers to maintaining the safety and soundness of the bank. Knowing the basics of banking law will enable every banker to grasp the requirements of his or her job and perform it with more understanding. This course is a guide to legal and regulatory issues, with special emphasis on the Uniform Commercial Code.

  
  •  

    CAIB 210 - Personal Tax. Financial Statements (1)


    This course provides participants with the ability to extract key information from 1040 Federal Tax Returns to determine projected income. Participants will learn how to explain to customers why the loan was declined due to insufficient projected income and how the different schedules were analyzed.

  
  •  

    CAIB 211 - Economics for Bankers (3)


    This course introduces the fundamental principles of economics. Special emphasis is placed on macroeconomics and topics of importance to you as a banker.

  
  •  

    CAIB 212 - Money & Banking (3)


    This course presents a fundamental of how money functions in the US and world economies. Topics include the concept of money supply and the role your bank plays as a money creator and participant in the nation’s payment mechanism. This course also explains how the various types of financial institutions operate, the workings of monetary and fiscal policies, the functions and powers of the Federal Reserve and more.

  
  •  

    CAIB 213 - Commercial Lending (3)


    This course provides the knowledge and skills required to identify the credit needs of various types of small business customers and to sell a “total banking” relationship. It also prepares participants to assess the customer’s credit worthiness by examining income statements and balance sheets. This course covers both the technical side of small business lending and the interpersonal skills required to be a successful loan officer.

  
  •  

    CAIB 214 - Financial Accounting (3)


    This course teaches students the information needed to create financial statements including trial balances, t-accounts, balance sheets, and various other accounts and their respective functions. This course emphasizes current practices of accounting procedures and includes overage of the latest principles set forth by the Financial Accounting Standards board (FASB).

  
  •  

    CAIB 215 - Law & Banking Applications (3)


    This course is an introduction to check processing, bank collections, consumer lending, and secured transactions.

  
  •  

    CAIB 216 - Marketing Financial Services (3)


    This course examines what motivates customers to purchase financial services and teaches how to develop a successful marketing plan. Topics include: developing a marketing plan, promotion, delivery channels, sales and sales management, product development, research techniques, communications and public relations, and future trends. There is also a special focus on customer satisfaction and service quality, and on advancements in technology for new products, new delivery systems, and new advertising forms. The course also reviews the increasing importance of social responsibility, community support, and concern for the natural environment.

  
  •  

    CAIB 217 - Mortgage Lending (3)


    This course provides an introduction to construction lending and other areas of commercial real estate finance, with particular emphasis on managing credit risk. Real estate law, appraisal, and investment analysis are also covered. This course introduces principles of finances related to the following real estate categories: condominiums, multifamily rental properly, retail property, office, warehouse, and lodging property.

  
  •  

    CAIB 299 - Special Topics (1-4)


    A special topic (ST) has a different course description for each course offered under the ST code. The division will keep a record of every special topics course offered with this subject code, including the course description.


Business

  
  •  

    BUSN 101 - Introduction to Business (3)


    This course provides an overview of the complex building blocks of business including administration, management, finance, labor, marketing, law and ethics. These aspects are considered in reference to local and global markets, e-commerce, and evolving technology and trends. Students put newly acquired knowledge to work in the development of a business plan making the course a cornerstone for business majors and entrepreneurs alike.

  
  •  

    BUSN 103 - Accounting I (3)


    This course enables students to understand the basic functions of business accounting and the ethical communication of financial information. It examines the accounting process, transaction analysis, asset and equity accounting and financial statement preparation and analysis. The focus of the course is on the single proprietorship, but an overview of partnership and corporate accounting is also included.

    Prerequisite(s): ACFN 065  or Placement.
  
  •  

    BUSN 105 - Business Communication (3)


    This course examines the process of communication and the challenges to and effective practices of communicating in a business environment. Topics include listening skills and verbal, nonverbal, and written communications. The dynamics of communicating in a group, global, and culturally diverse environment are also investigated. Students apply a systematic approach to plan and create effective letters, memos, reports, presentations, electronic and other forms of business communication.

    Prerequisite(s): ACFN 010  or Placement.
  
  •  

    BUSN 110 - Principles of Sales (3)


    This course is an introduction to the principles of sales, the role of the professional salesperson in the marketing process, and sales management. The importance of relationship building and ethical behavior are stressed as students develop techniques for prospecting and qualifying buyers, identifying and overcoming objectives, and closing a sale. Characteristics of the local as well as the global market are discussed.

  
  •  

    BUSN 170 - Customer Service Management (3)


    This course goes beyond a discussion of service to an analysis of the strategies that enable a business to attract, satisfy, and retain customers profitably. Students discover the importance of management, communication, and training in meeting customers’ needs.

  
  •  

    BUSN 180 - Personal Finance (3)


    This course offers a study of personal financial management. Students are equipped with the tools to make informed decisions related to spending, saving, borrowing, and investing to achieve financial goals now and in the future.

    Prerequisite(s): ACFN 065  or placement.
  
  •  

    BUSN 190 - Human Resources Management (3)


    This course covers the components of human resource management from organizational assessment to manpower planning including recruitment and selection, training and development, and evaluation and compensation. The impact of employment laws, ethical considerations, global competition, and rapid technological advances on small and large organizations is also considered.

  
  •  

    BUSN 191 - Organizational Behavior (3)


    This course examines the behavior of individuals and individuals in groups in organizations, and how the two affect the overall performance of an organization. Students consider the impact of individual attitude, motivation, job satisfaction, and communication on the organization. Group dynamics, leadership, organizational culture, and change are also addressed.

  
  •  

    BUSN 199 - Special Topics (1-4)


    Special topic courses may be offered from time to time dependent upon current trends, employer needs, and student interests. The course description, objectives, and credit hours for each will vary based upon the topic and schedule.

  
  •  

    BUSN 200 - Business Ethics (3)


    This course considers business actions and decisions in relation to moral principles and values. Beginning with an introduction to ethical theory and the personal credo, students apply a systematic approach to ethical decision making; that approach is then applied to business situations involving employee relations, consumer affairs, finance, government, and international competition. The role and expectations of business in society, both locally and globally, are discussed.

  
  •  

    BUSN 209 - Consumer Behavior (3)


    This course studies the complexity of buying decisions and how attitudes and perceptions, social class and family status, and technology and marketing influence those decisions. Consumers are considered as individuals and as members of groups to make decisions on sales, advertising, and new product development. Students learn to be more effective marketing managers as well as more savvy consumers.

  
  •  

    BUSN 210 - Marketing (3)


    This course provides an in-depth study of the four pillars of marketing: product, price, placement, and promotion. These aspects are considered in reference to local and global markets, e-commerce, and evolving technology and trends. Students put newly acquired knowledge to work in the development of a marketing plan.

  
  •  

    BUSN 211 - Advertising (3)


    This course addresses the basic theories, processes, and techniques of the most visible aspect of marketing communications. Local and global markets, e-commerce, and evolving technology and trends are considered as students plan and implement a successful advertising campaign using a variety of media vehicles.

  
  •  

    BUSN 212 - Business Law (3)


    This course is an introduction to the American legal system and its impact on the business environment. Topics considered include contracts, employment law, antitrust law, torts, consumer protection, and the business organization. This study prepares students to identify and limit risk in business dealings.

  
  •  

    BUSN 215 - Human Relations & Management (3)


    This course analyzes relationships in the business environment and their effects on the management function. Students apply principles of behavioral science in a business environment related to planning, change, diversity, leadership, decision making, and conflict resolution. The skills and attitudes necessary for professional advancement are also discussed.

  
  •  

    BUSN 218 - Principles of Management (3)


    This course examines the basic functions of management – planning, organizing, coordinating, and controlling - in a business organization. Students study management theory and practice in order to identify their own management style and appreciate the complex nature of management. The impact of social responsibility, corporate culture, and technological advances on management is also considered.

  
  •  

    BUSN 230 - Business Etiquette & Image (3)


    This course provides students a hands-on opportunity to develop the professional image needed to succeed in business. Topics include professional dress, conduct at work, managing technology, networking, interviewing, and resume development. This course is recommended for second year students.

  
  •  

    BUSN 275 - Management & Leadership (3)


    This course empowers students to assess their leadership potential by studying successful leaders of the past and present. With a focus on business, students consider the skills required to set goals for an organization and direct the actions of others to achieve them. Nontraditional texts are utilized to prepare students for lifelong learning after college.

    Prerequisite(s): Student must have completed 26 credit hours in business or related courses or have approval of the instructor.
  
  •  

    BUSN 278 - Teamwork & Managing Teams (3)


    This course examines how managers create, develop, and maintain quality, high-performance teams in the workplace. Students work in teams throughout the semester to develop skills relevant to individual and team performance. Topics include creating the culture for teamwork, team dynamics, team problem solving, and managing teams.

    Prerequisite(s): Student must have completed 26 credit hours in business or related courses or have approval of the instructor.
  
  •  

    BUSN 292 - Business Internship (1-6)


    This course serves as the capstone in experiential learning for Business majors. Students work a minimum of 150 hours in a professional business environment applying their academic learning while gaining real-world experience and career development.

  
  •  

    BUSN 294 - Business Practicum (1-6)


    For Business majors already working full-time in an approved professional business environment, this course serves as the capstone in experiential learning. Students apply their academic learning to a minimum of 150 hours of special projects or expanded responsibilities on the job acquiring new skills and expanding career development.

  
  •  

    BUSN 299 - Special Topics (1-4)


    Special topic courses may be offered from time to time dependent upon current trends, employer needs, and student interests. The course description, objectives, and credit hours for each will vary based upon the topic and schedule.

  
  •  

    CBUS 103 - Basic Accounting Fundamentals (3)


    Basic Accounting Fundamentals includes instruction in analyzing, journalizing, and posting business transactions, keeping financial records and the preparation of financial statements. The course also introduces other important aspects of accounting including: payroll, banking, petty cash, returns, allowances, discounts, and depreciation. While the single proprietorship form of business organization provides a basis for most of the discussion and work, an overview of partnership and corporate accounting is also included.

  
  •  

    CBUS 105 - Business Communications (3)


    The course examines all aspects of business communication. Students learn and exercise their abilities to communicate using memos, letters, reports, presentations, resumes, and electronic communication. Various techniques to develop and utilize listening, interviewing, interpersonal, and oral presentation skills are demonstrated and reinforced.

 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7