Nov 24, 2020  
2020-2021 Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Catalog

Course Descriptions


 

Other Courses

  
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    ~ Core Coursework - Transfer Agreement


    The Higher Education Policy Commission is charged by statute with ensuring that undergraduate core coursework completed at any of its institutions is transferable as general studies credit to all other state institutions of higher education in West Virginia for credit with the grade earned. Though system policy provides that undergraduate coursework is generally transferable among state institutions, there is no requirement that courses transferred will meet the general studies requirements at receiving institutions.  The purpose of this procedure is to establish a process and format which will enable students who transfer from one state college or  university to another to transfer core coursework that will count toward fulfillment of general studies requirements at the receiving institutions. To facilitate the discharge of this statutory responsibility, the following agreement for transfer of core coursework at state higher education institutions in West Virginia and listing of institutional courses that are acceptable for transfer under this agreement has been developed.  Each institution shall be responsible for identifying each course listed in its course catalog that is also listed as a CCTA course. Such courses shall be identified on the official and unofficial school transcript with a tilde (~) as the lead character on the course title.

     


Accounting

  
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    ACCT 150 - Intro to Accounting Profession (1)


    This course introduces students to the accounting profession and its role in business. The student will explore various fields of accounting and career paths.  The purpose is for students to develop an understanding of career possibilities and professional accounting certifications.

  
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    ACCT 180 - Personal Finance (3)


    This course offers a study of personal financial management. Students are equipped with the tools to make informed decisions related to spending, saving, borrowing, and investing to achieve financial goals now and in the future.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 100 - Math Essentials (3)  or placement
  
  
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    ACCT 199 - Special Topics (1-4)


    A special topic (ST) has a different course description for each course offered under the ST code.  The division will keep a record of every special topics course offered with this subject code, including the course description.

  
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    ACCT 201 - Principles of Accounting I (3)


    This course is a study of the fundamental theory and principles of accounting concepts for reporting financial information to business users. The course stresses the relationship between the rules by which financial statements are prepared and the use of financial statement information for decision making. This course covers accounting terms, organization of accounts, the accounting cycle, working papers, and financial statements. This study continues in ACCT 202 - Principles of Accounting II (3) .

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 100 - Math Essentials (3)  or placement
  
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    ACCT 202 - Principles of Accounting II (3)


    This course continues and concludes the fundamental study of financial accounting and then introduces the study of theory and principles of managerial and cost accounting concepts. The course stresses the use of accounting information for decision making and role of managerial accounting in a business environment.  This course covers budgeting, costs systems, accounting for corporations, and financial statement analysis.

    Prerequisite(s):  
  
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    ACCT 215 - Small Business Accounting (3)


    This course offers an introduction to some basic accounting practices for small businesses with application using accounting software.    In this course, the student will be developing an accounting system for a small business and then using the system to manage the finances of a small business. This course covers accounting terms, basic accounting concepts, the accounting cycle, and financial statements.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 100 - Math Essentials (3)  or placement
  
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    ACCT 220 - Payroll Accounting (3)


    This course covers the underlying payroll theory, application, and compliance with various state and federal payroll regulations.  Presents accounting systems and methods used in computing and recording payroll.  Students will complete a comprehensive payroll simulation for a fictitious company's payroll activities for a full quarter, including payroll transactions, pay processing, and tax form completion.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 201 - Principles of Accounting I (3)  
  
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    ACCT 230 - Intermediate Accounting I (3)


    This course is an in-depth study of the theory and principles, along with the application of accounting concepts for reporting financial information.  The accounting conceptual framework, information systems and components of the financial statements will be emphasized.  This study continues in ACCT 231 - Intermediate Accounting II (3) .

    Prerequisite(s):   
  
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    ACCT 231 - Intermediate Accounting II (3)


    This course is a continuation of ACCT 230 - Intermediate Accounting I (3) . An in-depth study of the theory and principles, along with the application of accounting concepts for reporting financial information.    The accounting conceptual framework, information systems and components of the financial statements will be emphasized.   Specifically, this course will cover accounting theory and practice for assets, liabilities, and equity.

    Prerequisite(s):   
  
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    ACCT 250 - Managerial Accounting (3)


    This course is a focus on the fundamental concepts of managerial accounting. It includes the analysis of internal accounting information with emphasis on the use of such data for performance evaluation, control, cost analysis, capital budgeting, cash flows, and cost information.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 201 - Principles of Accounting I (3)  
  
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    ACCT 260 - Income Tax (3)


    This course is a study of the Internal Revenue Code and regulations for individuals, partnerships, and corporations. It includes an in-depth study and application of the IRC for income, deductions, expenses and tax credits for individual and small business.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 201 - Principles of Accounting I (3)  
  
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    ACCT 261 - Individual Taxation (3)


    This course introduces students to the basic issues and concepts of individual taxation principles. Students observe federal tax laws as applied to the preparation of the Form 1040 and related schedules. Tax preparation software is utilized for case projects.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 201 - Principles of Accounting I (3)  
  
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    ACCT 262 - Business Taxation (3)


    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of tax law regarding business federal income taxation. Planning issues of estates and gift taxation are part of this course. Tax preparation software is utilized for case projects.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 261 - Individual Taxation (3) 
  
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    ACCT 280 - QuickBooks Accounting (3)


    This course offers a study of the application of general purpose accounting software, Quick Books.  In this course, the student will learn to create companies, enter and process data, generate reports and complete the accounting cycle for small businesses.  Then the student will complete several comprehensive projects where they will create a new company, record transactions, and produce reports for various types of fictitious companies.  The student will be required to take a national competency test, the Quick Books Certified User exam.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 201 - Principles of Accounting I (3)  and CAS 111 - Information Literacy (3)  
  
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    ACCT 292 - Field Experience (3)


    Field experience allows students to practice knowledge and essential skills learned in a real work setting beyond the boundaries of campus.  Students will be required to complete 50 hours working in the field per credit hour enrolled and a required 1 credit live or online course.  The course component will direct students in compiling an employment career portfolio.  Must complete 50% of degree requirements.

  
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    ACCT 299 - Special Topics (1-4)


    A special topic (ST) has a different course description for each course offered under the ST code.  The division will keep a record of every special topics course offered with this subject code, including the course description.


Agribusiness

  
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    AGRB 101 - Agribusiness Introduction (3)


    This course presents a basic introduction to Agribusiness and Agriculture. Students will gain basic understanding of various topics in Agribusiness.

  
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    AGRB 110 - Introduction to Animal Science (3)


    Students will survey the major disciplines in animal and veterinary sciences. Emphasis will be on terminology and the study of breeds of livestock and identification. 

  
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    AGRB 112 - Intro to Equestrian Science (3)


    Students will focus on the basic understanding of equine science and management. Topics will include the history and future of equine, breeds, health and basic management.

  
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    AGRB 113 - Intro to Swine Production (3)


    Students will focus on the basic understanding of swine science production and management. Topics will include breeding, health, and overall management.

  
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    AGRB 114 - Intro Poultry, Goats, & Llamas (3)


    Students will study poultry, goats, and llamas. Emphasis will be on terminology, the study of breeds, and identification.

  
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    AGRB 115 - Intro to Cattle Production (3)


    Students will focus on the basic understanding of cattle science, production and management. Topics will include breeding, health, and overall management. 

  
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    AGRB 116 - Companion Animal Science (3)


    Students will explore the basic physiology, nutrition, and genetics of companion animals. This course will also explore basic handling, training, behavior and health issues.

  
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    AGRB 120 - Intro to Food Production (3)


    This course will provide training in food production management with emphasis on large and small-scale food preparation and kitchen operations.

  
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    AGRB 122 - Farm to Table & Microgardens (3)


    Students will learn the basics of creating microgardens and the fundamentals to produce products almost anywhere. Students will also study how to take their product from the farm to the table.

  
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    AGRB 124 - Licensing and Food Safety (3)


    Students will study the approved procedures for food safety to include handling of utensils and equipment, food protection, and hygiene. Study will also include discussions in state licensing guidelines.

  
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    AGRB 126 - Sustainable Agriculture (3)


    Students will study techniques such as crop rotation, soil fertility, erosion prevention, and limiting pests. Larger and more productive harvests are the ultimate goal.

  
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    AGRB 128 - Intro to Crop Production (3)


    Students will focus on the basic understanding of crop science, production, rotation, and protection. Topics will include types of crops, types of pesticides, and modern rotation practices.

  
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    AGRB 130 - Customer Service Excellence (3)


    Students will experience what it means to give and receive excellent customer service. Tips, tricks, and techniques from the nation's best companies will be shared.

  
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    AGRB 140 - Agribusiness Marketing (3)


    This course will introduce concepts in Agriculture marketing. Students will examine the links between producers and consumers and rapidly changing factors that affect the marketplace.

  
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    AGRB 150 - Agribusiness Management (3)


    This course will provide an overview of the agribusiness decision-making processess. Financial statements and budgeting will be analyzed. 

  
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    AGRB 160 - Intro to Farm Equipment (3)


    Students will study and learn about basic farm equipment. Repair and safety techniques will be taught to assist the student with basic machine repairs.

  
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    AGRB 170 - Agricultural Govt Relations (3)


    This course presents an introduction to state and local governments and the influence on the agricultural industry.  Students will gain an understanding of governmental regulations and the relationships as it relates to the agricultural industry.

  
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    AGRB 180 - Landscape Design (3)


    Students will learn how to design and layout the steps for planning a landscape. The primary focus of this course will be the fundamentals of landscape design and site analysis. Upon successful completion, students will be able to prepare a basic landscape design for future customers.

  
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    AGRB 181 - Intro to Landscape Plants (3)


    Students will learn to identify landscape plants and expand knowledge to select the correct plant, site, and purpose. Students will understand that care and disease protection of plants are crucial in longevity designs. 

  
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    AGRB 182 - Intro to Trees & Shrubs (3)


    Students will learn to identify landscape trees and shrubs to expand knowledge and understanding of proper tree selections for site and purpose. Students will also understand proper planting and installation.

  
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    AGRB 183 - Landscape Accessories (3)


    Students will learn about the "extras" that make landscape design unique to each customer. Topics include pond creation, patios, lighting, retaining walls, outdoor entertaining spaces, and water features. Students will learn how to incorporate these "extras" into landscape design projects.

  
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    AGRB 199 - Special Topics (1-4)


    A special topic (ST) has a different course description for each course offered under the ST code. The division will keep a record of every special topics course offered with this subject code, including the course description.

  
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    AGRB 210 - Princ of Animal Science (3)


    Students will survey the major disciplines in animal and veterinary science. Emphasis will be on terminology and the study of different breeds and identification.

  
  
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    AGRB 217 - Animal Nutrition (3)


    Students will study, learn and practice basic animal nutrition for a variety of animal breeds. Course will include lecture and practical experience.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 101 - ~Introduction to Mathematics (3)  
  
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    AGRB 226 - Princ of Sustainable Ag (3)


    Students will study techniques such as crop rotation, limiting pests, soil fertility and erosion prevention. Larger and more productive harvests are the goal.

  
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    AGRB 228 - Princ of Crop Production (3)


    Students will focus on crop science, production, rotation and protection of crops. Topics will include types of crops, types of pesticides and modern rotation principles.

  
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    AGRB 240 - Agribusiness Marketing (3)


    This course will introduce concepts in agriculture marketing. Students will examine the links between producers and consumers and the rapidly changing factors that affect the marketplace.

  
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    AGRB 250 - Principles of AGRB Mgmt (3)


    This course will provide an overview of the agribusiness decision-making processes. Financial statements and budgeting will be analyzed.

  
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    AGRB 270 - State and Local Government (3)


    This course will examine state and local governments and the influence on the Agricultural industry. Students will gain an understanding of regulations and relationships.

  
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    AGRB 280 - Advanced Landscape Design (3)


    Students will learn to create complex landscape designs. Students will practice combining mixed concepts into a design and learn how to work within environmental constraints.

  
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    AGRB 281 - Pest Management (3)


    Students will learn to identify pests, recognize and control diseases, weeds, and insect issues. Pesticide use and alternate methods will be discussed. Pesticide certification will be reviewed; however, students will not gain certification in this course.

  
  
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    AGRB 299 - Special Topics (1-4)


    A special topic (ST) has a different course description for each course offered under the ST code. The division will keep a record of every special topics course offered with this subject code, including the course description.


Applied Laboratory Technician

  
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    LTEC 101 - Laboratory Technician I (4)


    This course is the introductory course to chemistry concepts. This course will also introduce instrumentation, industrial processes and the science that is needed to be a successful Applied Laboratory Technician.

    Corerequisite(s): MATH 100 - Math Essentials (3)  or placement 
  
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    LTEC 102 - Laboratory Technician II (4)


    This course will continue the discussion of chemistry concepts with a focus on molecular compounds, chemical reactions, acids & bases, and an introduction to organic chemistry concepts.  A WorkKeys NCRC Certificate Examination will be conducted at the end of this course.

  
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    LTEC 111 - Laboratory Technician III (2)


    This course presents a basic introduction to industrial safety health and environmental health concepts.  Students will be able to discuss and recognize the various hazards that exist in a manufacturing environment. The students will discuss the remediation of spills and unsafe conditions. This course will provide OSHA 30 General Industry certification that will include OSHA's history.

  
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    LTEC 112 - Laboratory Technician IV (3)


    Students will continue with basic laboratory principles and will be able to use various types of analytical equipment that an applied laboratory technician will operate in a manufacturing setting.  The student will be able to identify various types of process equipment and describe what each piece of equipment does within the manufacturing process.

  
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    LTEC 120 - Biology for Technicians I (4)


    This course will introduce Applied Laboratory Technician, A.A.S.  students to cells, genetics, and evolution & diversity with an emphasis on laboratory applications and techniques. Topics include cell structure, patterns of inheritance, and evolution of microbial life. Students will also be able to function successfully within laboratory settings, including the use of basic equipment (microscopes, measurement devices, and computer technologies), as well as utilizing appropriate safety protocols for manufacturing quality control. This course has an emphasis on biological topics needed for quality control/ quality assurance in microbiologic laboratories.

  
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    LTEC 121 - Biology for Technicians II (4)


    This course is a continuation of LTEC 120 - Biology for Technicians I (4)  for students in the Applied Laboratory Technician, A.A.S.  This course will introduce students to ecology and animal structure & function with an emphasis on laboratory applications and techniques. Topics include communities and ecosystems and nervous, sensory, and locomotor systems. Students will also be able to function successfully within laboratory settings including the use of basic equipment (microscopes, measurement devices, and computer technologies), and utilize appropriate safety protocols for manufacturing quality control. This course has an emphasis on quality control/quality assurance within manufacturing for biology.

    Prerequisite(s): LTEC 120 - Biology for Technicians I (4)  
  
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    LTEC 140 - Process Quality (2)


    This course will describe the concepts and tools that manufacturers use for quality control in a manufacturing setting.  The students will be able to describe the different management systems that are used to develop a quality control program.  The students will be able to develop and interpret quality control charts.

  
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    LTEC 141 - Analytical Instrumentation (3)


    The students will further explore the different analytical testing methods that are used in the industry.  The students will be able to complete testing on FT-IR, Spectrophotometer, HPLC, and GC-MS instruments.

  
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    LTEC 142 - Instrument & Process Control (2)


    Students learn the instruments and process variables that are important for managing the flow of manufacturing processes.  The student will understand how different environmental variables impact the manufacturing process and how control loops are managed.

  
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    LTEC 143 - Process Technology-Operation (3)


    This course will discuss the following topics: procedure writing, communication, shift change, maintenance, and other topics that Applied Laboratory Technicians and Quality Control Technicians must understand.

  
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    LTEC 144 - Process Technology-Systems (3)


    Applied Laboratory Technician students learn the many different systems that an applied laboratory technician will encounter including, but not limited to, water systems, electrical systems, and refrigeration systems.

  
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    LTEC 160 - Water Operator I (3)


    This course prepares students to take the West Virginia Water Operator I test.  The test is administered by the State of West Virginia by Environmental Engineering Division District Office.

  
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    LTEC 161 - Waste Water Operator I (3)


    This course prepares students to take the West Virginia Waste Water Operator I test.  The test is administered by the State of West Virginia by Environmental Engineering Division District Office.

  
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    LTEC 199 - Special Topics (1-4)


    A special topic (ST) course has a different course description for each course offered under the ST code.  The division will keep a record of every special topics course offered with this subject code, including the course description.

  
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    LTEC 200 - Microbiology for Technicians (4)


    This course is for Applied Laboratory Technology A.A.S. students and is an introduction to general microbiology for microbiology manufacturing technicians with an emphasis on manufacturing applications and techniques. Overview of cell structure, cell metabolism, genetics, bacterial growth & control, bacterial cultivation, bacterial isolation, bacterial classification, identification of the major groups of bacteria, and identification of infections and immunity; as these topics apply to quality control in manufacturing. The course includes an introduction to viruses, protozoa, fungi, and algae.  In both the laboratory and lecture, students will demonstrate an understanding of basic microbiology as it applies to quality control in manufacturing. Students are introduced to safety procedures specific to microbiology laboratory procedures.  Students will demonstrate basic laboratory skills and application of these skills performing lab based activities.

    Prerequisite(s): LTEC 121 - Biology for Technicians II (4)  
  
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    LTEC 201 - Industrial Microbiology (4)


    In this course for Applied Laboratory Technology A.A.S. students, students will be able to understand the physiology, nutrition, and growth of microorganisms that are important to various industries.  Microbiological safety procedures are also emphasized. Students learn diseases specific to laboratory production workers. The students will also understand how to control microbial growth in industrial production processes and also understand the application of microorganisms in the production of cells, primary and secondary metabolites.

    Prerequisite(s): LTEC 200 - Microbiology for Technicians (4)  
  
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    LTEC 211 - Federal Lab Safety & Regs (3)


    This course is for Applied Laboratory Technician, A.A.S.  students. This course will build on the knowledge gained in LTEC 111 - Laboratory Technician III (2)  with an emphasis on manufacturing applications and techniques. The students will be asked to apply some of the safety concepts learned inLTEC 111 - Laboratory Technician III, like handling equipment safely, handling, storing and disposing of chemicals safely, using emergency equipment; as well as safety planning. This course will also discuss OSHA's Laboratory Safety Guidance document and 29 CFR 1910 as it pertains to laboratory safety. The students will be able to discuss all the physical, chemical, and biological hazards discussed in OSHA's Laboratory Safety Guidance document.

    Prerequisite(s): LTEC 111 - Laboratory Technician III (2)  
  
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    LTEC 250 - Adv QC Lab Practices: GLP (3)


    This course is for Applied Laboratory Technology A.A.S. students. Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) is essential knowledge for quality control technicians within a manufacturing setting. Topics include: quality assurance in GLP; standard operating procedures for GLP work; inspections: procedural, process, and facility; report and data audits; and quality assurance and contract research organization: GLP studies. Good Laboratory Practices, techniques for the QA professional is aimed at: chemists, clinicians, ecotoxicologists, operation managers, pharmaceutical process managers, quality assurance officers, technicians, and toxicologists.

    Prerequisite(s): LTEC 112 - Laboratory Technician IV (3)  
  
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    LTEC 260 - Adv QC in Manufacturing: GMP (3)


    This course is for Applied Laboratory Technology A.A.S. students. Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) are guidelines that provide a system of processes, procedures, and documentation to assure that the product produced has the identity, strength, composition, quality, and purity that it is represented to possess. This course is an introduction to the principles and practices of Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP). The student will use 21 CFR 211 as a tool to identify the best practices in manufacturing of food, drugs, biologics, and medical devices. 

    Prerequisite(s): LTEC 112 - Laboratory Technician IV (3)  
  
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    LTEC 270 - Lab Reporting Methods: GDP (3)


    This course is for Applied Laboratory Technology A.A.S. students. Good documentation serves both production and compliance needs. This practice is Good Documentation Practices (GDPs) and collectively are the set of activities that enable you to record your data and hand-written entries in a legible, traceable, and reproducible manner. Students will be able to understand and use identifiers such as identification numbers and control numbers as it relates to manufacturing quality control laboratory work.  The students will be able to use or create documents such as specification documents, standard operating procedure documents, logbooks, and quality manuals.  The Applied Laboratory Technology A.A.S. students will be able to create or interpret materials handling documentation, maintenance documentation, quality control documentation, quality assurance documentation, production documentation, and validation documentation.

    Prerequisite(s): LTEC 112 - Laboratory Technician IV (3)  
  
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    LTEC 292 - Internship (1-4)


    Students obtain practical experience in the chemical manufacturing industry, chemical laboratory, or water treatment industry.  The student engages in on-the-site activities of a practical nature.  Interns learn how to translate classroom theory and methods into professional skills.  Activities are under the supervision of trained personnel.  Application for the internship must be made to the Applied Laboratory Technician program manager.

    Prerequisite(s): LTEC 101 - Laboratory Technician I (4)  and LTEC 102 - Laboratory Technician II (4)  
  
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    LTEC 299 - Special Topics (1-4)


    A special topic (ST) course has a different course description for each course offered under the ST code.  The division will keep a record of every special topics course offered with this subject code, including the course description.


Apprenticeship

  
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    APTR 101 - ACDS:Intr Child Developmnt I (5)


    This course introduces students to the foundations of early childhood professions principles and practices including basic child and classroom observations.  The course highlights health, safety, and nutrition relating to early childhood and WV licensing laws that pertain to these areas.  Students can identify cognitive, emotional, and social appropriate development. 

  
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    APTR 102 - ACDS:Planning for Whole Child (5)


    This course emphasizes respecting cultural diversity among children and families.  Students explore how to enhance cognitive development in young children and how to support emotional development.  Students begin classroom management and learn the value of print-rich classrooms.  Observation skill practice continues. 

  
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    APTR 103 - ACDS:Facilitation of Learning (5)


    This course emphasizes family and community engagement skills including verbal and non-verbal communication.  Child development continues with a focus on language, literacy, mathematics, science, and arts inquiry.  Students learn to prepare a lesson plan and can define the currently popular approaches to learning.  Students learn challenging behavior management.  

  
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    APTR 104 - ACDS:Becoming Independent (5)


    This course prepares early childhood professionals to advocate for children and their families and the profession.  Students learn the WV licensing law and WV afterschool program standards.  Students learn to identify students with exceptionalities and disabilities.

  
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    APTR 105 - Apprenticeship in Child Development (1-10)


    This course provides the apprentice with 4,000 hours of supervised on-the-job training in participating childcare programs. Formal instruction is integrated with direct experience in early education settings where apprentices reflect and critically analyze their experiences. A portfolio is used to document the apprentice's learning/work throughout the apprenticeship program.


Art

  
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    ART 103 - ~Introduction to Visual Arts (3)


    This is an introductory course designed to survey prehistoric to contemporary visual art forms, giving insight into their nature and their relationships to the human condition. The course includes a study of the functions of various forms of art in which students are exposed to a variety of visual arts experiences to promote a deeper understanding of and appreciation for the role of the visual arts throughout human history and in contemporary society.

  
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    ART 105 - Creativity, Color, & Design I (3)


    This is a foundational course which introduces and explores human creativity, the creative process, color theory, color formulation, design, composition, and the roles of creativity, including therapeutic, in personal life, society, and industry.  Classroom and home studio exercises enable students to explore materials, approaches, and principles of creativity, color, composition, design, and execution.  Individuals gain self-identity and a working understanding of creativity, art media, and personal aesthetics.  Note: NO prerequisites.  This course is open to all; no previous visual art training or experience is necessary.

  
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    ART 115 - Drawing I (3)


    This course introduces general drawing and compositional principles. Students will train their eyes and hands, develop powers of observation and learn to translate what they see on to paper. A variety of materials will be used: charcoal, pastel, and pencil. Drawing techniques covered are gestural line, contour "blind" drawing, still life, perspective. Students will focus on the elements of good drawing such as proportion, shading and modeling, line, and composition. As skills develop, students explore the expressive potential of different materials. Students will also look at various works of art to critique and analyze their composition/historical value and develop a portfolio of their studies and drawings.

    Pre-requisite/Co-requisite(s): Students are responsible for purchasing art supplies.
  
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    ART 199 - Special Topics (1-4)


    A special topic (ST) has a different course description for each course offered under the ST code. The division will keep a record of every special topics course offered with this subject code, including the course description.

  
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    ART 205 - Creativity, Color, & Design II (3)


    This course continues to provide foundations and explore personal creativity, the creative process, color theory and psychology, color formulation, design, and the roles of creativity, including therapeutic, in personal life, society, and industry.  The course emphasizes self-discovery and personal creative expression.  Classroom and home studio exercises enable students to explore materials, methods, principles of color, composition, design, execution, and presentation to gain self-identity, personal freedom, and a working understanding of art media, personal aesthetics, and presentation.  Works from this class are exhibited at Blue Ridge CTC and at the Berkeley Art Works in Martinsburg, giving "hands-on" exhibit and portfolio-building experience.  Note:  Neither ART 105 nor prior art training is a prerequisite for ART 205.

  
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    ART 206 - Creat, Color, & Design III (3)


    This third level elective utilizes longer studio atmosphere class meetings to explore human creativity in-depth and receive mentoring in sync with personal interests. Practitioners engage with media of their choice, conceptualize and exercise their own creativity, explore their own aesthetics and creative process and produce at least four finished, presentable artworks. Using a "studio reference" type text, the instructor/mentor also further grounds students in color and design theory and psychology, composition, electronic media platforms, and the role and application of creativity in lifelong learning. ART 206 is designed to complement and support ART 103, ART 105, ART 140, ART 205, MDIA 121 and other design-related courses.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 205 - Creativity, Color, & Design II (3)  
  
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    ART 215 - Drawing II (3)


    This course is a continuation of Drawing I with an introduction to color dynamics and precision drawing as used in creative expression with an emphasis on composition. Students become more skilled with visual elements and drawing principles. A broader range of materials and techniques will be used. Subject matter will include still life, landscape, and imagined subjects. It is expected that students will spend a minimum of three additional clock hours per week on work outside the scheduled class time for each studio class.

    Pre-requisite/Co-requisite(s): Students are responsible for purchasing art supplies.
  
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    ART 299 - Special Topics (1-4)


    A special topic (ST) has a different course description for each course offered under the ST code. The division will keep a record of every special topics course offered with this subject code, including the course description.


Allied Health Science

  
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    CAHS 105 - Science for Allied Health (3)


    This a one-semester preparatory course designed for students who plan to enroll in Allied Health courses in the future.  The course reviews basic principles of chemistry, cell biology, cell processes, and basic math skills with applications to biology and chemistry.  Reading, writing, and study skills are emphasized throughout the course.

  
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    CAHS 140 - Intro to Healthcare (3)


    This course is a foundation course for selected Allied Health programs. The course introduces students to a variety of health occupations and assists students in acquiring the basic knowledge skills, and professional behaviors needed to work and interact with clients in a healthcare setting.

  
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    CAHS 141 - Intro to Pharmacology (3)


    This course provides information on a variety of medications that are commonly administered in the healthcare setting. Major drug categories associated with body systems will be reviewed. Students will learn about drug pharmacokinetics, dosage, preparation, administration and interactions.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 100 - Math Essentials (3)  or placement
  
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    CAHS 142 - Pathophysiology of Disease (3)


    Pathophysiology of diseases will build upon previously learned knowledge of normal anatomy and normal physiology. This course will discuss pathologies and abnormalities that are deviations from the norm. For all pathologies, we will discuss causes, signs and symptoms, diagnosis, diagnostic tests, treatments, and prognosis. The pathologies will be organized according to the body system, including cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, gastrointestinal, urinary, reproductive, endocrine, nervous, musculoskeletal, and integumentary. Other topics will include infectious diseases, neoplasms, hereditary diseases, diseases of the blood, and mental/cognitive disorders.

  
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    CAHS 143 - Spanish for Healthcare (3)


    Medical Spanish for HealthCare Providers has been designed for healthcare practitioners and all individuals who interact with Hispanic patients who have limited English communication skills. Emphasis will be placed on communication and phrases needed to complete a patient assessment, and explain medical procedures.

  
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    CAHS 150 - EKG Technician (1–12)


    This comprehensive Certified EKG Technician Program prepares students to function as EKG/Cardiovascular Technicians and to take the American Society of Phlebotomy Technician (ASPT) - Electrocardiograph (EKG) Technician exam in addition to other National Certification Exams. This course will include important practice and background information on the anatomy of the heart and physiology, medical disease processes, medical terminology, medical ethics, legal aspects of patient contact, laboratory assisting, respiratory therapy assisting, electrocardiology and echocardiology. Additionally, students will practice with equipment and perform hands-on labs including introduction to the function and proper use of the EKG machine, the Holter monitor, the normal anatomy of the chest wall for proper lead placement, echocardiology, 12-lead placement and other clinical practices. EKG Technicians also analyze printed readings of EKG test, measuring various "peaks and troughs" and determining normal vs. abnormal EKG. The EKG/Cardiovascular Technician Certification Program includes a graded final exam to help prepare students for the ASPT-EKG Technician Exam. This course is eligible for college credit after successful completion of the program.

  
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    CAHS 151 - Medical Coding/Billing (1–12)


    This billing and coding course offers the skills needed to solve insurance billing problems, how to manually file claims (using the CPT and ICD-10 manual), complete common insurance forms, trace delinquent claims, (EOB's) and use generic forms (CMS 1500) to streamline billing procedures. The course covers the following areas: CPT (introduction, guidelines, evaluation, and management), specialty fields (surgery, radiology, and laboratory), ICD-10 (introduction and guidelines) and basic claims processes for medical insurance and third-party reimbursement. Students will learn how to find the service codes using coding manuals (CPT and ICD-10) This course is eligible for college credit after successful completion of the program.

  
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    CAHS 152 - Pharmacy Technician (1–12)


    This comprehensive course will prepare students to enter the pharmacy field and to take the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board’s PTCB exam. Technicians work in hospitals, home infusion pharmacies, community pharmacies and other health care settings - working under the supervision of a registered pharmacist. Course content includes medical terminology specific to the pharmacy, reading and interpreting prescriptions and defining drugs by generic and brand names. Students will learn dosage calculations, I.V. flow rates, drug compounding, dose conversions, dispensing of prescriptions, inventory control billing and reimbursement. The pharmacy Technician Certification Program includes a graded final exam to help prepare students for the PTCB exam. This course is eligible for college credit after successful completion of the program.

  
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    CAHS 154 - Dental Assisting (1–12)


    The Dental Assisting program prepares students for entry-level positions in a variety of healthcare settings including dental offices, hospitals, and other similar facilities, familiarizing the student with all areas of pre-clinical dental assisting and training in the professional skills required to function as an assistant in the dental practice. It covers the following key areas and topics - Administrative aspects: the history of dentistry and dental assisting; introduction to the dental office; the legal aspects of dentistry and dental assisting; policies and guidelines. Clinical aspects: an introduction to oral anatomy; dental equipment, operation, and maintenance; introduction to tooth structure; primary and permanent teeth; the oral cavity and related structures; proper patient positioning; dental handpieces; dental anesthesia; sterilization; maintaining sterility and asepsis. This program does not include a national or state certification objective which in most states require 1 to 2 years of training or education. This course is eligible for college credit after successful completion of the program.

  
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    CAHS 156 - Phlebotomy Tech w/Extern (10)


    The Phlebotomy Technician w/ Externship prepares students to collect specimens for the purpose of laboratory analysis.  Students will become familiar with all aspects of blood collection and develop skills to perform venipunctures completely and safely.  The 80-hour classroom includes terminology, anatomy and physiology; blood collection procedures; hands-on practice; and training in skills and techniques to perform venipuncture.  The Externship requires students to perform 100 hours in a CLIA approved laboratory setting and function under direct supervision of a phlebotomist.  Externship sites will be assigned by the Phlebotomy Externship Coordinator.

  
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    CAHS 171 - Advanced Patient Care (4)


    This hands-on course is designed to provide skills and performance for providers working in a healthcare setting. Students will demonstrate patient care skills maintaining safety, comfort, and caring behaviors while applying appropriate standards of care.

  
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    CAHS 199 - Special Topics (1-4)


    A special topic (ST) has a different course description for each course offered under the ST code. The division will keep a record of every special topics course offered with this subject code, including the course description.

  
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    CAHS 206 - HC Law & Ethics (3)


    This course introduces the complex legal, moral, and ethical issues involved in providing healthcare services. Emphasis is placed on the legal requirements of healthcare professionals; HIPPA regulations; the role of documentation and ethical completion. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of current medical law and accepted ethical behavior.

 

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